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SINKING CREEK COVERED BRIDGE

           It’s over Sinking Creek in Giles County in Newport and was built in 1916. It is owned by the county, open to the public, but closed to traffic.

           The covered bridge was left in place when a new concrete bridge was built in 1963. The bridge was offered to the adjacent property owners. Miller on the north side of the creek refused to accept it because he didn’t want the responsibility of maintaining it. He expected it to be given to the county. There is no record of deed conveying the land at each end to either the county or the state.  So all these years no one knows who owns the bridge.  In 1995 the county of Giles announced ownership. Land at each end has been acquired. Hopefully, it will be maintained regularly for this is a unique covered bridge site.

            The south bank of the creek is lower than the north bank and requires an elevated approach roadway. About 51’ from the south portal is an underpass for farm animals to get to the other side of the road. It was designed as part of the roadway and has side walls of concrete blocks, timber planking for the riding surface and side rails. Between the underpass and south portal, the road is paved with personalized bricks. This was the Newport Village Council’s fund raising project to pay for repairs to the covered bridge. Labor was furnished by volunteers from Virginia Tech and local citizens.

           The covered bridge is 70’-10” long and 13’-10” wide and has a modified Queenpost truss with a segmental arch. The center of the arch is almost 10’ high above the floor because this is a longer span than the other bridges in Giles County.

           Much of the history of these three covered bridges in the Newport area was derived from local citizens.

           Recently, flood waters of Sinking Creek rose to overflow its south bank and high enough to endanger all the covered bridges in the area.

           Now that the County owns the bridge, they should record it with the Virginia Landmarks Commission and the National Register of Historic Places.

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